Tom Brady and Kurt Warner are football legends…Amani Toomer and Merril Hoge are village idiots

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Football needs to become a safer sport.

In response to the recent suicide of Junior Seau, uneducated onlookers and certified clown pockets Amani Toomer and Merril Hoge bashed future Hall of Fame quarterback Kurt Warner for saying he would prefer that his sons not play football.

Earlier this morning, the father of two-time AP NFL MVP Tom Brady fervidly defended Warner and said he’d consider preventing his son from playing if faced with the same decision today.

“No, not without hesitation,” Tom Brady Sr. said. “I would be very hesitant to let him play.”

The 40-year-old Warner, also a two-time AP NFL MVP, who is one of only two signal-callers in history to throw 100 touchdowns with two different teams, retired as an Arizona Cardinal in January 2010 after suffering a concussion that left him punchy.

The winner of the 2008 Walter Payton Man of the Year Award has every right to guide his children as he deems fit and Toomer and Hoge have some set of pearls to intrude on the business of the Warner family.

Warner, who the Green Bay Packers signed as an undrafted free agent in 1994 out of the University of Northern Iowa, is one of the storybook superstars in league history.

Somewhat similarly, the 34-year-old Brady, a seven-time Pro Bowl selection, wasn’t chosen until the New England Patriots stole him with the 199th pick in the 2000 NFL Draft out of the University of Michigan.

Toomer and Hoge were adequate players with sporadic moments of success on the gridiron.

Despite having largely undistinguished professional careers, Hoge and Toomer maintain the right to express their opinions on the issue of safety in football.

Nevertheless, it is disconcerting on a number of levels that the Brady patriarch and Warner are so troubled with the idea of competing in a collision sport.

For various reasons, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has become an extremely polarizing individual.

Loathe or adore Goodell, the commissioner is undoubtedly correct that football needs to become less hazardous.

Without Goodell’s pledge to better protect players, tomorrow’s Tom Brady or Kurt Warner may never play the game that made them legends.

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